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DPJN's Message Board

Page history last edited by PBworks 13 years, 6 months ago

The Globeteer's Homepage

 

Global Research

 

 

 

(March 24, 07)

 

Paul:

 

Here's the link for my author Barney Warf.

 

 


Jessica's Common points:

 

Paul's summary:

  • both talk about global divide on internet access, inequality between rich countries and poor countries.
  • amount of internet users due to per capita income, geography, and technological sophistication

Darrel's Summary:

 

  • how to improve global digital divide. for example, improve the basic infrastructure; open up new markets, more training courses, etc
  • ICT technologies have huge influence on educational opportunity.

Nathan's Summary:

 

  • definition of global digital divide: difference in accessbility to digital technology for industrialized and non-industrialized countries
  • both talked about consequences of digital divide
  • digital divide needs to be bridged

 


(March 17, 07)

 

Nathan:

 

Common Points

 

Paul's summary also writes about the problems between rich countries and third world countries, which is common to mine too.

 

Darrel's summary writes about information and communication technologies (ICT) ministries, which is also mentioned in the article I research. I think we can read both article and link them by writing about ICT.

 

I suggest we have to read others arctile too, I think it would help more if we read the article not only summaries we wrote. We might left out some important points.

 


 

 

(March 17, 07)

 

Paul:

 

Hey guys, I can't get into our collaboration page yet because i used the wrong account. But i told erica to change the e-mail access.

 

I'll start my notes on here. (not sure if u guys started your notes yet but i almost forgot! So we are making notes on commonality between our articles.)

 

 

Common Points

 

Nathan's Summary:

  • Ishaq defines the global digital divide as a difference in accessbility to digital technology for industrialized and non-industrialized countries which continues to widen the gap between them economically
  • Ishaq points out that around 69 percent of the Internet users are living in the United States, Canada, and Europe, but there is less than one percent of people who have access to the Internet in the Middle East and Africa
  • In “Universal Access,” the constraint to have access to the Internet is “purely financial.” Ishaq clearly points out the problems that may occurred at different levels before having a proper digital environment: “at the local level, the costs of building the necessary infrastructure and procuring the equipment have to be financed.
  • Ishaq suggests that “the Internet offers incredible and unprecedented communications, learning and transaction opportunities for those connected to the Web,” but many users cannot “employ the Internet effectively.”

 

Jessica's Summary:

  • Drew Tiene examines the global digital divide, with tables of data that include the wide disparity between the worlds’s information-rich and information-deprived
  • he seven causes are culture, language, poverty, infrastructure, bureaucracy, corruption and protectionism

 

Darrel's Summary:

 

Hard to find any connections. But i remember we talked about them in class. Maybe you could clarify them or point them out in your part connecting my summary.

 

I hope this is what we could get down before sat night! Its a start...

 

 

 

 


 

Nathan's Summary:  On the Global Digital Divide       

 

           Ashfaq Ishaq (2001) in “On the Global Digital Divide” suggests that the global digital divide is a serious issue which is currently being discussed. Ishaq defines the global digital divide as a difference in accessbility to digital technology for industrialized and non-industrialized countries which continues to widen the gap between them economically. He further discusses this issue by dividing it into “The Big Divide,” “Universal Access,” “Training and Content,” “E-Learning and E-development,” and “The Next Revolution.” In “The Big Divide,” Ishaq points out that around 69 percent of the Internet users are living in the United States, Canada, and Europe, but there is less than one percent of people who have access to the Internet in the Middle East and Africa. In “Universal Access,” the constraint to have access to the Internet is “purely financial.” Ishaq clearly points out the problems that may occurred at different levels before having a proper digital environment: “at the local level, the costs of building the necessary infrastructure and procuring the equipment have to be financed. At the national level, the foreign exchange cost of importing needed equipment and services must be met. At the international level, a funding mechanism to promote universal access has to be established.” In “Training and Content,” Ishaq suggests that “the Internet offers incredible and unprecedented communications, learning and transaction opportunities for those connected to the Web,” but many users cannot “employ the Internet effectively.” Ishaq points out that nowadays schools and institutions are “placing their material online,” and this brings a new revolution in “learning and education.” However, Ishaq also argues that dealing with “universal access and an Internet-literate workforce” requires creating information and communications technologies (ICT) ministers, and ministers have to deal with “complex Internet issues ranging from privacy to taxation.” Ishaq suggests that there is a digital revolution which anyone has to realize. this idea is similar to the issue of  “digital immigrants” (qtd. In “Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants” by Marc Prensky), and Ishaq proposes that digital revolution should make people’s life easier in both learning and transaction. Finally, Ishaq argues that the “global digital divide needs to be bridged and the Internet’s potential to serve as a creativity playground for children needs to be harnessed in order to ensure that the next generation is more imaginative, innovative, creative, and artistic.”

 


 

 Jessica:

 

Summary of Addressing the Global Digital Divide and its Impact on Educational Opportunity

 

 divide.pdf

Notes for Gist

Cause of digital divide:

1)      culture: traditional societies, adoption of new technologies.

2)      Language: major barrierà making difficult for people to take advantage of resources.

3)      Poverty: fundamental factor in the digital divide à interfere with the upgrading à inefficient and corrupt bureaucracy slow process and diver much needed funds.

 

How digital divide affects people’s lives

à Educational opportunity

ICI is expensive

Remote rural settingà lack electrification and telecommunications

                                à Lack of technical expertise

                                à Hard to find affordable price

Ways of funding:

-Government, development organization, philanthropists

 

Strategies:

- project design

 

Summary:

      In “Addressing the Global Digital Divide and its Impact on Educational Opportunity,” Drew Tiene examines the global digital divide, with tables of data that include the wide disparity between the worlds’s information-rich and information-deprived. The cause of digital divide and ramification for the world’s poor are examined, with an emphasis upon how it affects educational opportunity. The seven causes are culture, language, poverty, infrastructure, bureaucracy, corruption and protectionism. Drew also discussed some potentially successful strategies for utilising education technologies in developing settings are explored, including, appropriate project design, funding issues( from governments, development organizations, and philanthropists), skill development programs(training facilities) for schools, new forms of distance education( for example, web courses) and the establishment of tele-centres that can expand educational opportunities in many ways.

                                                                                                     

 

 

 

 

 


 

Paul: (March 13)

 

Summary of Multiple Geographies of the Digital Divide

 

    The "World Wide Web" is somewhat of an ironic saying. Hardly "[living] up to its name" as there are evident inequalities in internet access between First and Third Worlds. Rich countries (United States, Canada, Australia, Germany, United Kingdom, Japan, etc) are the ones who thrive on the Internet the most, whereas Third World countries (most of Africa, South America, etc) have little to no access at all. Variations in per capita incomes, geography, and technological sophistication are "the [keys]" to the amount of Internet users. Global access to the Internet is conditioned by the "desity, reliability, and affordablility, of national telephone systems, which form the heart of the architecture of cyberspace". A highly integrated national telephone system promotes excellent "two-way communication". However, Internet is not always desired since "many governments have come to hear the Internet for its emancipatory capabilities" and have thus put certain constraints and limits on Internet use. For example, the Chinese Government limits access to Internet after the 1989 Tienanmen Square Massacre. Moreover, in other countires such as Mexico, Internet was used to "influece popular opinion for [the Political Government's] cause". "The degree to which different groups of users employ its capabilites, depends largely on their technological sophistication and their access to high-speed machines and fiber-optic lines, all of which emanate from existing social relations."

 


 

 

Darrel: (March 13)

 

Summary of Global Digital Divide Journal

    The development of ICT in developing countries can be a huge opportunity for transforming their economic, social and education sectors and would benefit the global market. "ICT can be applied selectively and innovatively to directly enhance the welfare of the poor" of these countries and also "promote more efficient delivery services...and ensure rapid dissemination of market information". This global digital divide can not be altered immediately because it must be done productively by not just investing in ICT development, but also "improving the basic infrastructure; opening up markets; breaking telecommunication monopolies; pursuing an effective legal and regulatory system; and providing education for all". Governments, especially of poor countries, play a key role in promoting all of these changes gradually and with the help of the high-tech nations this global digital divide will become substantially more balanced and the global market will greatly benefit from it.

 

 


 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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